Speak/Spoke/Spoken

On the way to bilingualism, my fellow English-learners and I have come to the conclusion that the essential flaw in our apprentissage is the obvious lack of exposure to English. The amount of time spent actually speaking the language in real conversation has been negligible. When personal enthusiasm and motivation slowly fade as well, one may wonder: how can French students learning English get real experience? Should they continuously eavesdrop to catch the melodious sound of a native speaker talking, and try to sneak into conversations? Or are there better solutions? My first suggestion was successful on many occasions, yet to enjoy regular opportunities, why not try to find a weekly meeting? Read more!

What Future for English?

One of the great advantages of studying English is that it does not just grant access to a wide array of different English-speaking cultures extending over five continents, but to a rich repository of non-native cultures as well.

A scholar of English literature does not only read Wilde, Walcott and Hemingway, but also Nabokov, Conrad, Ishiguro and Rushdie. Nowadays English is not only the universal second language, but also the second most spoken native tongue worldwide, the official language of 70 countries, which controls about 40% of the world’s total GNP1, and influences international media, cinema, music, science and computing. But how long will its supremacy last? Read more!